Category Archives: Reference

The Death of Noah B. Hayes

Tuesday, 4 February 1941, Noah B. Hayes was killed in a tragic accident on Highway 60 near Morehouse, Missouri. The Sikeston Herald, a newspaper in nearby Sikeston, Missouri, recounted the incident two days later, thusly:

Crash Fatal to Gray Ridge Man


Chest Pierced by Timber Loosened from Trailer.

Struck by a flying timber loosened from an automobile trailer in a highway accident early Tuesday night, N. B. Hayes, 50-year-old Gray Ridge farmer, was fatally injured and died at the Sikeston General Hospital two hours later. None of the others involved in the accident were injured, and damage done to the vehicles was negligible.

According to the report made by State Trooper Vincent Boisaubin, Hayes was a passenger in a car driven by E. R. Gardner, 39, and owned by Merl Gardner, 20, who was also a passenger. All three lived about 2½ miles north of Gray Ridge. The car was pulling a small trailer.

Running out of gas while traveling east on Highway 60 three miles west of Morehouse, Gardner stopped his car and Hayes got out with a gallon can of gasoline to re-fill the tank.

As he was standing between the car and the trailer, filling the tank, another east bound vehicle, driven by Dempsey Graham of Matthews, grazed the trailer, tearing off some of the sideboards. One of these boards was flung through the air and pierced the chest of the Gray Ridge farmer, caving in his ribs. Graham, who was 20 years old, was accompanied by Julius Graham, 18, and W. A. Overby, 19, all of Matthews.

The injured farmer was brought to Sikeston in the Safety Car of the State Highway Patrol by State Trooper Cletis Bidewell, former Sikeston school teacher. Though fatally injured, Hayes retained consciousness until several minutes before his death at 9:10 o’clock.

Mr. Hayes was born near Gray Ridge on June 11, 1894. He is survived by his widow and five children: Lorene, Louise, Betty Mae, Rebecca and Joe Hayes, all of Gray Ridge. Three sisters, six brothers and his father, Joseph Hayes of Arkansas, also survive.

Funeral services for Mr. Hayes were held this afternoon at Clinton, Ark., and interment made there.

Death Certificate

Mr. Hayes’ death certificate offers some information not included in the Sikeston Herald article.

His name was recorded as Noah B. Hayes – the newspaper article called him only “N. B. Hayes.”

His wife, mentioned in the article but not named, was Noami Hayes, age 36.

Noah was a veteran of the World War.

Hayes Death Certificate Excerpt

Portion of death certificate describing cause of death.

His exact age: 46 years, 7 months, 23 days. The article rounded his age to 50, even though it mentioned his birth date and his precise age could’ve been calculated. He was born in Billings, Missouri.

Time of death was noted as 9:15 P.M. The article reported time of death as “9:10 o’clock.”

His parents’ names were Joe Hayes and Rebecca Bishop.

His cause of death was given as “massive hemorrhage” and “shock” due to “lacerated-contused wound right anterior duct wall + rib fracture + laceration of lung” due to “automobile accident.”

The attending physician was A.P. Martin, M.D.

Burial

Noah B. Hayes was buried on Thursday, 6 February 1941 in Salem Cemetery, Van Buren County, Arkansas.

Graham Connection

Dempsey and Julius Graham, the driver and one passenger of the auto that struck the trailer, were the sons of John Jasper Graham and Danner Copeland.

Sources

NewspaperArchive.com. The Sikeston Herald, Thursday, 6 February 1941. Retrieved on 30 September 2013.

Missouri Digital Heritage. Missouri Death Certificates, 1910 – 1962; Name: Noah B. Hayes; Date of Death: February 1941; County: Scott; Certificate Number: 4517. Retrieved on 30 September 2013.

Find A Grave. Noah Hayes, Memorial 102976982. Retrieved on 30 September 2013.

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Arkansas & Missouri 1940 Census Index Released

Ancestry.com has completed and released a searchable index of the 1940 United States Census for the states of Arkansas and Missouri. I did a quick search for Grahams from Searcy County, Arkansas and got a number of good results in both Arkansas and Missouri.  You can search their index for free by visiting http://www.ancestry.com/1940-census.


WW2 Records Free At Fold3 In April

To help celebrate the release of the 1940 United States Census on its sister site Ancestry.com, Fold3 is offering free access to its collection of records from the Second World War until 30 April 2012.

Check out their collection here:

http://go.fold3.com/wwii/


An Account of Searcy County, Arkansas

The following account of Searcy County, Arkansas is quoted from a book with the incredibly long title of  The Province and the States – A History of the Province of Louisiana Under France and Spain, and of the Territories and States of the United States Formed Therefrom, Volume VII, published in 1904.

Searcy county, formerly included in Marion county, came into existence November 5, 1835, and its name was soon changed to Marion county. The present Searcy county was created out of Marion county December 30, 1838. It is bounded, north by Boone and Marion counties, east by Stone, Baxter and Van Buren counties, south by Pope and Van Buren counties, west by Newton county. It was named in honor of Richard Searcy, who came from Tennessee to Lawrence county in 1817 and was prominent in Arkansas affairs as long as he lived.

Searcy county’s population in 1840 was 936; in 1850, 1,979; in 1860, 5,271; in 1870, 5,614; in 1880, 7,278; in 1890, 9,664; in 1900, 11,988. This county is well supplied with public schools and churches. There is also one high school, the Marshall academy, at Marshall, the county seat. Marshall, the largest town in the county, has several churches, high schools, mills, two newspapers, and a diversity of mercantile and mining interests. St. Joe, Leslie, Blanco, Snowball, Witt’s Springs and Tomahawk are other principal points in the county.

William Wood was judge of Searcy county, 1836-38; Joseph Rea, 1838-40; J. Campbell, 1840-42; J. D. Robertson, 1842-44; C. P. Thomas, 1844-48; P. B. Ruff, 1848-50; J. K. Lenna, 1850-52; A. J. Melton, 1852-56; J. S. Wilson, 1856-62; W. H. Jones, 1862-64; J. J. Barnes, 1864-66; Josiah Lane, 1866-72; F. A. Robertson, 1874-76, 1878-80; Jesse Cypert, 1876-78, 1880-84; J. A. McIntire, 1884-86; W. N. Cummings, 1886-90; J. A. Rombo, 1890-92; N. S. Bratton, 1892-94; G. W. Drewery, 1894-98; W. H. Sutterfield, 1898-1902; J. A. Moore, 1902-04.

William Kavanaugh was clerk, 1836-38; William Ruttes, 1838-40; T. H. Boyce, 1840-42; J. M. Hensley, 1842-44; C. J. Bolton, 1844; Alex. Hill, 1844-48, 1852-64; C. A. McCain, 1848-52; J. S. Stevenson, 1864-66; W. M. Hayes, 1866-68; C. A. P. Horn, 1868-74; S. E. Hatchett, 1874-76; J. W. Morris, 1876-78; J. N. Hamilton, 1878-80; J. W. Hensley, 1880-84; M. Dampf, 1884-86; V. C. Bratton, 1886-90; M. A. Sanders, 1890-94; J. R. Aday, 1894-98; J. M. McCall, 1898-1900; W. F. Reeves, 1900-02; J. W. Smith, 1902-04. This official is clerk of the circuit court and ex-officio clerk of the county and probate courts and recorder.

E. M. Hale was sheriff, 1836-38; Joe Brown, 1838-42; Josiah Lane, 1842-44; J. C. Jamerson, 1844-46; Hiram Evans, 1846-47; C. A. McCain, 1847-48; William Thornhill, 1848-50; R. N. Melton, 1850-52; Alex. Gray, 1852-54; P. A. Tyler, 1854-58; W. S. Lindsey, 1858-60; T. M. Alexander, 1860-62; S. L. Redwine, 1862-64; J. W. S. Leslie, 1864-66; L. D. Jameson, 1866-72; B. P. Hensley, 1872-74; C. F. Williams, 1874-76; J. N. Hamilton, 1876-78; A. R. Allen, 1878-80; N. J. McBride, 1880-84; B. F. Snow, 1884-86; C. P. Lawrence, 1886-90; A. H. Luna, 1890-92 (superseded by M. J. Bride); W. P. Hodges, 1892-94; V. C. Bratton, 1894-96; J. N. Bromley, 1896-98, 1902-04; J. A. Melton, 1898-1900; R. A. Watts, 1900-02.

V. Robertson was treasurer, 1838-42; J. D. Shaw, 1842-44, 1858-60; Robert Cagle, 1844-46; William Baker, 1846-50; Joseph Rea, 1850-54; L. Burns, 1854-58; E. Long, 1860-64; W. S. Boyd, 1864-66; F. Thompson, 1866-68; G. Ross, 1868-72; J. W. Hensley, 1872-74; J. W. Morris, 1874-76, 1890-92; T. Thompson, 1876-88; John W. Morris, 1888-90; Matthew Sooter, 1892-94; C. A. Horn, 1894-98; N. M. Bratton, 1898-1900; J. T. Gray, 1900-04.

The Republican, established 1890, is published at Marshall by Albert Garrison. The Mountain Wave, established 1892, is published at Marshall by William A. Wenrick.

Sources

Godspeed, Weston Arthur, ed.  The Province and the States, Volume VII, page 145-7. Madison, WI, USA: The Western Historical Association, 1904. Retrieved from Google Books on 20 October 2011.


87th Division’s WWI History

I’ve been browsing the Internet to find a more in-depth picture of what the 87th Division was doing during their time in France during the First World War.  While there are a plethora of sites that recount the division’s Second World War history, in which they participated in various combat campaigns, there is little in the way of their First World War history, which saw the division used as laborers, something not quite as exciting or as historically significant as a battle.  So, I was quite excited to come across this detailed account of the division’s First World War history written by the Historical Branch, War Plans Division, General Staff, United States Army.


THE EIGHTY-SEVENTH DIVISION

(National Army.  Insignia:  Brown acorn on a green circle.)

—–o—–

The Eighty-seventh Division was organized at Camp Pike, Arkansas, in August, 1917, from drafted men of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi,  and Alabama.  After providing detachments for replacements abroad the division  was reorganized with recruits from other camps, and upon transfer to Camp Dix, New Jersey, in June, 1917[1], approximately 20,000 drafted men from New York and New Jersey were assigned.  The organization was as follows:

  • 173d Infantry Brigade:
    • 345th and 346th Infantry;  335th Machine Gun Battalion.
  • 174th Infantry Brigade:
    • 347th and 348th Infantry[2];  336th Machine Gun Bn.
  • 162d Field Artillery Brigade:
    • 334th and 335th (light),  336th (heavy) Field Artillery;  312th Trench Mortar Battery.
  • 334th Machine Gun Battalion.
  • 312th Engineers.
  • 312th Field Signal Battalion.
  • Trains.

The first element of the division arrived in France August 28, 1918;  the last September 16, 1918.

The division was reported to the Commanding General, S.O.S.[3], for duty the latter part of September.  Headquarters were established at Pons (Charente Inférieure) on September 12th.  The organizations were distributed through the base and intermediate sections, S.O.S.,  but the division did not lose its identity as a combat unit, and when the armistice was signed, it was under orders for service at the front and the headquarters and headquarters troops were actually in movement on November 11th.

Division headquarters sailed from St. Nazaire January 10, 1919,  and arrived at New York January 22, 1919.

The division had three commanding generals as follows:

Maj. Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis (assigned), Aug. 26, 1917 – Nov. 18,  1918;  Brig. Gen. Robert C. Van Vliet (temporary), Nov. 27, 1917 – March 10, 1918; Brig. Gen. W. F. Martin (temporary), Dec. 11, 1918 – January 9, 1919.

Revised to 3-16-21

RPL–egm


Notes

1.  This date appears to be a typo.  The unit could not have transferred to Camp Dix in June 1917 before it was organized at Camp Pike in August 1917.  A date of June 1918 is more likely for the move to Camp Dix, as this would’ve been directly before the division’s movement to France in August of that year.

2.  My grand uncle William Thomas Graham served in Company F of the 348th Infantry.

3. Services of Supply.

Sources

Brief History of Divisions, U.S. Army, 1917-1918”, Historical Branch, War Plans Division, General Staff, United States Army, June 1921.


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