Tag Archives: Arkansas

Arkansas Death Certificates May Now Be Ordered Online

Some good news came today via Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. To quote:

The Arkansas Department of Health rolled out a new service on Monday that allows users to search and order state death certificates on the Web. Previously, the records were available only through in-person requests or paper-form submissions

The new online database currently offers only records of deaths that occurred from 1935 to 1961 on the website, but the department said that workers will be adding records in the coming months. Users may search by last name, death date, county of death and state of birth.

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Arkansas & Missouri 1940 Census Index Released

Ancestry.com has completed and released a searchable index of the 1940 United States Census for the states of Arkansas and Missouri. I did a quick search for Grahams from Searcy County, Arkansas and got a number of good results in both Arkansas and Missouri.  You can search their index for free by visiting http://www.ancestry.com/1940-census.


Silas Copeland & California Cypert

1870

Silas Richard Copeland was born on Friday, 10 February 1871 in Griggs Township, Van Buren County, Arkansas. He was the son of Burgess M. Copeland.

California E. Cypert was born circa 1872 in Arkansas. She was the daughter of William and Asenath Cypert.

1890

On Monday, 15 August 1892, Silas Richard Copeland, age 21, of Marshall in the county of Searcy, married California E. Cypert, age 20, of the county of Van Buren. The marriage was performed in Van Buren County by judge J. H. Fraser and recorded by county clerk  J. B. Thompson. Security on the marriage bond was Wm. Moody.

Wednesday, 9 May 1894, their daughter Virgie Viola Copeland was born.

Tuesday, 29 December 1896, their son William Martin Copeland was born.

Silas Richard Copeland died in Searcy County on Friday, 30 April 1897, at the age of 26. He was interred at Marshall Cemetery in the city of Marshall, Searcy County. At the time, California was approximately five months pregnant.

Monday, 23 August 1897, the baby girl Silas Danner Copeland was born. She never knew her daddy, but was apparently named for him.

California Copeland PatentSaturday, 22 April 1899, the land office in Harrison, Arkansas issued a land patent to “California E. Copeland, widow of Silas R. Copeland, deceased…” for a parcel located at “the North West quarter of the North East quarter, the North East quarter of the North West quarter and the South half of the North West quarter of Section Two in Township thirteen North of Range sixteen West of the Fifth Principal Meridian in Arkansas, containing one hundred and fifty-six acres and forty-five hundredths of and acre.” Since homesteaders had to occupy their land for five years before being issued a patent, Silas and California had settled this parcel sometime around 1894, perhaps even as soon as following their marriage in 1892, allowing for the inevitable governmental delays in processing paperwork.

1900

I have not been able to find California and the children on the 1900 census for Searcy County, Arkansas. She was granted a land patent only a year before the census, so I think it unlikely she would have been living elsewhere. It appears that the family was simply not enumerated.

In late 1900, California would remarry. That union shall be covered in a future article.

Sources

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census. Census Place: Griggs, Van Buren, Arkansas; Roll: M653_51; Page: 474; Image: 476; Family History Library Film: 803051. Accessed 7 June 2012.

Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index. Name: Virgie Condley; Issue State: Arkansas; Issue Date: Before 1951. Accessed 7 June 2012.

Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index. Name: William Copeland; Issue State: Oklahoma; Issue Date: Before 1951. Accessed 7 June 2012.

Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index. Name: Danner Graham; Issue State: Missouri; Issue Date: 1958-1959. Accessed 7 June 2012.

"Arkansas, County Marriages, 1837-1957," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NMP2-NBZ : accessed 7 June 2012), S R Copeland, 1892.

Nancy Weaver. "S.R. Copeland". Find A Grave. Accessed 7 June 2012.

Bureau of Land Management, United States Department of the Interior. General Land Office Records. Document number: 12337; Application: 20855; Issue Date: 22 April 1899. Accessed 7 June 2012.


Ruby Down!

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My trip to Arkansas for the Graham reunion is cancelled. My Chevy Equinox, which the kids call “Ruby,” was rear-ended while we were waiting at a traffic light last Friday. Everybody is fine, but Ruby is out of commission.


Rambo School

Here is a collection of photographs of the old Rambo School, located on Searcy County Highway 8, about half a mile southwest of Rambo Cemetery in Arkansas. The school was established circa 1889, according to the faded sign above its door. Many Grahams and Watts attended class here, including my dad! I don’t presently know when the school originally closed. After sitting unused for some time, it was restored in 1997 and rechristened Rambo Community Center. Since then, it appears that the building was used for religious services for a while (indeed, there are references online calling it Rambo Church) before it fell again into disuse and disrepair. These photographs show its state as of Saturday, 4 June 2011.  Photographs © Ashli B. Graham.

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Graham and the Wild Lands

An allusion has been made to the Homestead Law. I think it worthy of consideration, and that the wild lands of the country should be distributed so that every man should have the means and opportunity of benefitting his condition.

Abraham Lincoln, 12 February 1861

This year will mark the 150th anniversary of the Homestead Act. The act was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln on 20 May 1862 and offered settlers a free title to 160 acres of undeveloped land west of the Mississippi River.  Applicants had to be 21 or older, had never taken up arms against the United States, had to live on the land for five years and show evidence of having made improvements. Upon meeting the conditions they would be granted completed ownership via a land patent from the General Land Office. 270 million acres were claimed and settled under the Act, and of that, 8 million acres were in Arkansas.

Jesse Graham settled his family in the “wild lands” of Searcy County, Arkansas sometime in the 1870s.  Circa 1890, Jesse applied for a tract of land located at the “…east half of the South West-quarter, the North West-quarter of the South West-quarter and the South West-quarter of the North West-quarter of Section four in Township thirteen North of Range sixteen West of the Fifth Principal Meridian in Arkansas containing one hundred and sixty acres and sixteen hundredths of an acre…” On 22 May 1895, with Jesse having satisfied the conditions set forth in the act, the General Land Office granted him a land patent. (Homestead Certificate Number 10164, application 13986.)

Jesse’s son John Henry Graham married Matilda Bohannon on 3 October 1889 and soon thereafter applied for his own tract of land under the Act, located next to his father’s tract, at the “…southwest quarter of the southwest quarter of Section four and the east half of the southeast quarter and the southeast quarter of the northeast quarter of Section five in Township thirteen north of Range sixteen west of the Fifth Principal Meridian, Arkansas, containing one hundred sixty and fifty-four hundredths acres…” The General Land Office granted John’s land patent on 17 August 1907. (Homestead Certificate Number 17932, application 29798.)

John’s eldest son, Jessie Cornelius Graham, also benefitted from the Homestead Act. On 11 March 1917, Jessie married Callie Watts, and the couple soon acquired a tract of land located at the “…east half of the southwest quarter and the south half of the northwest quarter of Section eight in Township thirteen north of Range sixteen west of the Fifth Principal Meridian, Arkansas, containing one hundred sixty acres…” The General Land Office granted Jessie’s land patent on 4 October 1921. (Document Number 014226, Patent Number 826903.)

For more information on the Homestead Act, or to look up your own relatives in the General Land Office records, visit the sources below.

Sources

Homestead National Monument of America, United States National Park Service. http://www.nps.gov/home Retrieved on 18 January 2012.

General Land Office Records, Bureau of Land Management, United States Department of the Interior. http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/default.aspx  Retrieved on 18-19 January 2012.

WikiPedia. “Homestead Act” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homestead_Act. Retrieved on 19 January 2012.


An Account of Searcy County, Arkansas

The following account of Searcy County, Arkansas is quoted from a book with the incredibly long title of  The Province and the States – A History of the Province of Louisiana Under France and Spain, and of the Territories and States of the United States Formed Therefrom, Volume VII, published in 1904.

Searcy county, formerly included in Marion county, came into existence November 5, 1835, and its name was soon changed to Marion county. The present Searcy county was created out of Marion county December 30, 1838. It is bounded, north by Boone and Marion counties, east by Stone, Baxter and Van Buren counties, south by Pope and Van Buren counties, west by Newton county. It was named in honor of Richard Searcy, who came from Tennessee to Lawrence county in 1817 and was prominent in Arkansas affairs as long as he lived.

Searcy county’s population in 1840 was 936; in 1850, 1,979; in 1860, 5,271; in 1870, 5,614; in 1880, 7,278; in 1890, 9,664; in 1900, 11,988. This county is well supplied with public schools and churches. There is also one high school, the Marshall academy, at Marshall, the county seat. Marshall, the largest town in the county, has several churches, high schools, mills, two newspapers, and a diversity of mercantile and mining interests. St. Joe, Leslie, Blanco, Snowball, Witt’s Springs and Tomahawk are other principal points in the county.

William Wood was judge of Searcy county, 1836-38; Joseph Rea, 1838-40; J. Campbell, 1840-42; J. D. Robertson, 1842-44; C. P. Thomas, 1844-48; P. B. Ruff, 1848-50; J. K. Lenna, 1850-52; A. J. Melton, 1852-56; J. S. Wilson, 1856-62; W. H. Jones, 1862-64; J. J. Barnes, 1864-66; Josiah Lane, 1866-72; F. A. Robertson, 1874-76, 1878-80; Jesse Cypert, 1876-78, 1880-84; J. A. McIntire, 1884-86; W. N. Cummings, 1886-90; J. A. Rombo, 1890-92; N. S. Bratton, 1892-94; G. W. Drewery, 1894-98; W. H. Sutterfield, 1898-1902; J. A. Moore, 1902-04.

William Kavanaugh was clerk, 1836-38; William Ruttes, 1838-40; T. H. Boyce, 1840-42; J. M. Hensley, 1842-44; C. J. Bolton, 1844; Alex. Hill, 1844-48, 1852-64; C. A. McCain, 1848-52; J. S. Stevenson, 1864-66; W. M. Hayes, 1866-68; C. A. P. Horn, 1868-74; S. E. Hatchett, 1874-76; J. W. Morris, 1876-78; J. N. Hamilton, 1878-80; J. W. Hensley, 1880-84; M. Dampf, 1884-86; V. C. Bratton, 1886-90; M. A. Sanders, 1890-94; J. R. Aday, 1894-98; J. M. McCall, 1898-1900; W. F. Reeves, 1900-02; J. W. Smith, 1902-04. This official is clerk of the circuit court and ex-officio clerk of the county and probate courts and recorder.

E. M. Hale was sheriff, 1836-38; Joe Brown, 1838-42; Josiah Lane, 1842-44; J. C. Jamerson, 1844-46; Hiram Evans, 1846-47; C. A. McCain, 1847-48; William Thornhill, 1848-50; R. N. Melton, 1850-52; Alex. Gray, 1852-54; P. A. Tyler, 1854-58; W. S. Lindsey, 1858-60; T. M. Alexander, 1860-62; S. L. Redwine, 1862-64; J. W. S. Leslie, 1864-66; L. D. Jameson, 1866-72; B. P. Hensley, 1872-74; C. F. Williams, 1874-76; J. N. Hamilton, 1876-78; A. R. Allen, 1878-80; N. J. McBride, 1880-84; B. F. Snow, 1884-86; C. P. Lawrence, 1886-90; A. H. Luna, 1890-92 (superseded by M. J. Bride); W. P. Hodges, 1892-94; V. C. Bratton, 1894-96; J. N. Bromley, 1896-98, 1902-04; J. A. Melton, 1898-1900; R. A. Watts, 1900-02.

V. Robertson was treasurer, 1838-42; J. D. Shaw, 1842-44, 1858-60; Robert Cagle, 1844-46; William Baker, 1846-50; Joseph Rea, 1850-54; L. Burns, 1854-58; E. Long, 1860-64; W. S. Boyd, 1864-66; F. Thompson, 1866-68; G. Ross, 1868-72; J. W. Hensley, 1872-74; J. W. Morris, 1874-76, 1890-92; T. Thompson, 1876-88; John W. Morris, 1888-90; Matthew Sooter, 1892-94; C. A. Horn, 1894-98; N. M. Bratton, 1898-1900; J. T. Gray, 1900-04.

The Republican, established 1890, is published at Marshall by Albert Garrison. The Mountain Wave, established 1892, is published at Marshall by William A. Wenrick.

Sources

Godspeed, Weston Arthur, ed.  The Province and the States, Volume VII, page 145-7. Madison, WI, USA: The Western Historical Association, 1904. Retrieved from Google Books on 20 October 2011.


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